3 Simple Work-Life Lessons I Was Reminded of While on Vacation

My family and I just finished a lovely vacation in Traverse City, Michigan. It was a much needed break from the grind and for us marked a commitment to taking more vacation/family time. Over the course of our vacation, I was reminded of 3 work-life lessons that are an essential practice if we want to avoid burnout and enhance our overall life-satisfaction. They are:

1) It’s ok to put work away. For the better part of a week I turned everything off and focused on the family. I had intended to finish writing my first book The Two Year Old’s Guide to Work-Life Balance” but quickly opted to just enjoy the moments with the family, Continue reading “3 Simple Work-Life Lessons I Was Reminded of While on Vacation”

The Work-Life War that Needs to End and How Managers Can End It (Part II)

 

Last week I discussed the tension that exists in the workplace between employees with children vs those without.  You can read last week’s blog before continuing here if you wish to get a deeper understanding.  If not, then what is important to note is that in the discussion of work-life issues the animosity between the two groups mentioned is often a byproduct of poor communication and a workplace culture that gives advantages to one group over the other.  Managers are at the center of this battle and in some cases are fueling the fight.

Here are 6 simple suggestions to help managers ease the tension.   They are not all encompassing but they will help.

Continue reading “The Work-Life War that Needs to End and How Managers Can End It (Part II)”

The Work-Life War that Needs to End and How Managers Can End It (Part I)

Work-life balance is a pain point for a lot of people. It seems that no matter what the industry, no matter who the person, there is always a reaction of ‘oh yea, I need help with that” every time I mention my speaking and research interests in the area.

There is a second, almost as common and often more uncomfortable reaction I get and it goes something like this:

“Work-life balance? Yea it’s important but I don’t matter because I don’t have kids or a spouse.” Continue reading “The Work-Life War that Needs to End and How Managers Can End It (Part I)”

4 Ways to Truly Appreciate Graduate Students All Year Round

This week marks the end Graduate and Professional Student Appreciation Week (GPSAW) across the country.  Although I am biased, graduate and professional students are a significant part of the campus ecosystem. Graduate students serve as instructors, administrators (a 20 hr. a week Grad Assistant is just a ½ employee in my book), innovate thought, and add a more mature dynamic on our campuses.

Taking time to celebrate, thank, acknowledge, and pamper grad students is something all campuses should have done this week. But what happens after this week? Do we go back to forgetting them and focusing on undergraduates again? I hope not. Here are 4 suggestions you can implement on your campus to make sure graduate students are appreciated and heard beyond the free donuts, massages, and swag that comes with GPSAW.

Continue reading “4 Ways to Truly Appreciate Graduate Students All Year Round”

3 Reasons You Need to Have the Work-Life Conversation With Your Boss

If you want to improve your work-life balance then there is one action step you must take. It’s a very logical action step but sadly, it is a step most employees unhappy with their work-life situation either fail to do it or avoid altogether.

That action is step is: to have the work-life conversation with your supervisor.

There are 3 very simple reason for you to do this. Continue reading “3 Reasons You Need to Have the Work-Life Conversation With Your Boss”

3 False Assumptions About Graduate Student Leaders

There is an underlying assumption that graduate student leaders do not need much support because they are more mature and experienced than undergraduate leaders. Although this may be true in some cases, this notion is based on 3 faulty assumptions. It should be noted that these assumptions are often subtly embedded in our structures and activities vs overt attempts to limit the graduate student leader experience.  In other words, campuses don’t mean to limit this experience but sometimes do so without realizing it mainly because they buy into one or all of these false assumptions. The assumptions are: Continue reading “3 False Assumptions About Graduate Student Leaders”

5 LESSONS I LEARNED FROM COMPETING IN THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP OF PUBLIC SPEAKING

 

*I should note if you want a more detailed description of my lessons from the WCPS please watch this video:

benefitsofspeech

It’s been 4 years since I made the semi-finals and had the honor to compete in the World Championships of Public Speaking (WCPS).  It is one of my more significant accomplishments as a speaker and definitely the greatest accomplishment I have achieved as member of Toastmasters International.   After the contest I decided to focus more on keynoting and seminars but there are 5 key lessons I took away from the process that I think all speakers should know.

Continue reading “5 LESSONS I LEARNED FROM COMPETING IN THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP OF PUBLIC SPEAKING”

5 Essential Habits for Public Speakers

I often get asked for advice on becoming a motivational speaker.  I am always more than willing to offer my two cents on the matter.   After all, I have had so many wonderful speaker do the same for me as I was starting out.  Having given people my advice numerous time now, I think there are 5 habits every speaker (motivational or not) needs to adopt if they are a) serious and b) care about crafting stories and talks that have impact.   These tips have nothing to do with the business of speaking (although these habits can help with that) and focus on the art of speaking itself.  These are the habits that work for me and the speakers I admire the most.

Continue reading “5 Essential Habits for Public Speakers”